Sony Music

Sony MusicThe Clash‘s acclaimed 1979 breakthrough album London Calling celebrates its 40th anniversary in December, and to mark the milestone, a collection of memorabilia from the influential punk band’s archives will go on display at the Museum of London this fall.

The exhibit, titled “The Clash: London Calling,” will open on November 15 and will run until spring 2020. Admission is free.

The exhibition will feature a variety of previously unseen items, like draft lyrics, stage-worn clothes and photos and film footage giving insight into the creation of the album. The display will also examine how the city of London influenced The Clash.

Among the specific artifacts that will be on view:  a notebook belonging to late Clash frontman Joe Strummer with the lyrics to a song called “Ice Age” — the song that became “London Calling.”

The display aslo features a bass guitar that Paul Simonon broke onstage at a New York City concert, a handwritten song sequence for London Calling by Mick Jones, Topper Headon‘s drum sticks and a typewriter Strummer used to write lyrics.

Coinciding with the exhibit’s opening, a companion 120-hardback book called London Calling Scrapbook will be released on November 15. The book will feature photos, memorabilia, notes, lyrics and more from the period when the album was made, and will come packaged with a CD copy of London Calling.

London Calling was The Clash’s third studio album. The double-LP, which reached #27 on the Billboard 200, included memorable tracks like the title tune, the band’s cover of the 1959 Vince Taylor tune “Brand New Cadillac,” “Spanish Bombs,” “Lost in the Supermarket” and “Clampdown.”

“Train in Vain,” a song not listed on the album’s back cover because it was a last-minute addition, became the group’s first top 40 hit in the U.S.

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